Deborah Martin

Contemporary American Realist Painter Deborah Martin

"Walt Whitman wrote in the preface to the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, “The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as affectionately as he has absorbed it.” This theme manifests throughout the work of Deborah Martin who conveys the essence inherent within marginalized communities that exist on the fringes of American society."

Anise Stevens, Los Angeles

"Deborah Martin is blessed with a technique that allows her to portray space and the things in it with a quavering, almost feverish luminosity as she trains her eye on all forms of the American outback...What interests Martin – whose pictures are full of human presence but devoid of humans – is not the mundane or the abject, but how habitation seems only to amplify the emptiness of the land itself. In this respect she extends Edward Hopper’s lonely realms into the context of “new topographic” photography".

Peter Frank, Los Angeles

"Martin’s paintings share Hopper’s sense of mystery: scenes tiptoe close enough to their off-balance subjects without intruding. In the desert paintings, Martin’s interest is what is lost when hardscrabble land attracts a developer’s eye; in her "Narrow Lands" series, a soft palette intimates the loss of the built environment, abandoned or gentrified into oblivion."

Susan Rand Brown, Provincetown