PROVINCETOWN ARTS MAGAZINE

In the last five years, Deborah Martin has concentrated on painting local habitations far removed from mainstream America, yet evoking quintessential core values in our national psychology. She manages to avoid a voyeuristic curiosity while honestly exposing unselfconscious attitudes of strange places where people have made themselves comfortable... Martin is something of an archivist, seeking out stories lost in time…motivated by the jumble of memory, wanting some confusion to activate her emotion.

Read More
LAQUINTA ARTS FOUNDATION

Over the past 30 years, however, interest in works by Wendt, Edgar Payne, Guy Rose, Maurice Braun, and others has increased in lockstep with American art in general. And many notable paintings depict the Palm Springs and the surrounding desert towns. Today, the Impressionist tradition continues with desert landscape painters such as Mary-Austin Klein, William Scott Jennings, Deborah Martin, Niles Nordquist, Andrew Dickson, and others.

Read More
AEQAI MAGAZINE

Walt Whitman wrote in the preface to the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, “The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as affectionately as he has absorbed it.” This theme manifests throughout the work of Deborah Martin, a contemporary painter who conveys the essence inherent within marginalized communities that exist on the fringes of American society.

Read More
PROVINCETOWN BANNER

While Martin has been compared to Truro’s Edward Hopper and Maine’s Andrew Wyeth, her brushwork has an open, flowing spontaneity; still, her subject has much in common with painters whose melding of landscape and structure offer a template for isolation and separation.

Martin’s paintings share Hopper’s sense of mystery: scenes tiptoe close enough to their off-balance subjects without intruding. In the desert paintings, Martin’s interest is what is lost when hardscrabble land attracts a developer’s eye; in her “Narrow Lands” series, a soft palette intimates the loss of the built environment, abandoned or gentrified into oblivion.

Read More
FABRIK MAGAZINE

What interests Martin – whose pictures are full of human presence but devoid of humans – is not the mundane or the abject, but how habitation seems only to amplify the emptiness of the land itself. In this respect she extends Edward Hopper’s lonely realms into the context of “new topographic” photography.

Read More
BACK OF BEYOND

In Back of Beyond, Martin immortalizes a 21st century desert struggle against destruction, and her lamentation for the disappearing landscape is also a praise song to the improbable power of endurance, tenacity, and longing.Painter Deborah Martin has established a compelling dominion as portraitist of an archaic America – ravaged sites and forgotten wastelands that nonetheless resist destruction. Her luminous paintings and photographs reveal the beauty in the bleak, and speak to the tenuous balance between home, depravation, isolation, community and hope.

Read More
PALM SPRINGS LIFE MAGAZINE

For decades, artists have come to the sea to put their stamp on its waters. In April, the Salton Sea History Museum in the restored North Shore Yacht Club opened its inaugural exhibition, Valley of the Ancient Lake: Works Inspired by the Salton Sea.

Curated by Deborah Martin (with historical works and memorabilia provided by Jennie Kelly), the exhibition features 10 artists who focus their work on the sea. To contextualize their paintings, drawings, and photographs, it’s helpful to know they follow the path of several generations of artists.

Read More
AMERICA

Martin’s noirish and oddly poignant images offer a hauntingly intimate elegy for small town American roadsides, refracted through a grim cataract of muffled sunlight, dusty colors, and bleached, exhausted exposures. Her vacant neighborhoods suggest a peaceful, bucolic apocalypse in which human abandonment is perhaps as much blessing as curse.

Read More
SHANA NYS DAMBROT EDITORIAL

Martin’s work is a kind of interpretative documentation; she stays true to the reality of her selected places. In addition to the Salton Sea sequel, she’s currently at work on a series about Cape Cod’s Narrowlands—a more vegetated but no less remote “vacation” destination less about the desert and more about vines, nature’s reclaiming of the cultivated, the process of decay, and the beauty in the breakdown.

Read More